Children in Mérida, Venezuela, Get Free Mentoring Support, Thanks to Distance Learning Portal

The non-profit Distance Teaching Mobile Learning (dtml.org) has expanded into Mérida, Venezuela. The expanded support means that children can find vetted volunteer mentors and tutors online. The non-profit seeks to battle poverty and improve access to education. A magic bullet does not exist, but what development economists do know is that networks matter: family networks, community networks, and educational networks. A 501(c)(3) non-profit, Distance Teaching Mobile Learning is working on closing the gap and bringing qualified and trustworthy mentors to kids around the globe.  

Distance Teaching Mobile Learning was founded with the premise that the biggest impact can be made by augmenting school activities with mentors help to provide assistance to kids where and when needed. Therefore, dtml.org partners with schools and educational institutions to leverage existing facilities to provide students with a free educational platform.

“Partnering with schools allows us to measure the effectiveness of the program, evaluate needs of the students and assess the quality of individual volunteers and mentors. It also allows us to tailor specific activities to the needs of the individual school,” says Nestor Jerez, Distance Teaching Mobile Learning Representative for the South American Region. “We are committed to providing qualified and engaged volunteers, mentors and tutors for students to use this technology for free anytime they need.”

The company cannot do it alone and we seek sponsors to support our mission of becoming a global force for education. When you are helping Distance Teaching Mobile Learning, your contribution is not a charity or pity; it is an investment in the children lives.

 NESTOR JEREZ, REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE SOUTH AMERICAN REGION

The program works by connecting verified, pre-screened volunteer mentors with a student on the dtml.org platform to establish a learning relationship that will guide students to adulthood. Research shows that stability matters, and mentoring works. By connecting with a qualified and engaged group of volunteer mentors and tutors, students create lifelong connections and develop the skills needed to be successful. Students can access more than just personal help.  Because the resources are online, learning can happen anywhere around the globe, or at any time. Venezuela is the latest country to be served by the non-profit.

 

 

 

 

 

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